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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
think the fiscal cliff uncertainty is going to continue t actually. so i'm a little more bearish in the near term. then i think it's a sell-off, if there is one, that should be bought aggressively for a rally in the end of 2013 that would be the beginning of a new bull market. >> when you say a rally towards the end of next year, do you think over the course of 2013 it's going to end higher? we're going to be higher than where we are right now? >> yeah, i mean, i think ultimately 2013 ends up higher at the end. i think we're going to go -- we're going to test some lower resistance in the first six, seven months of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial
's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that'
and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls church sitting down with the santana family. their parents who also are employed live in the household with them. so if taxes do go up on middle class americans, the overall hit on that household will be $4,000. so they're very concerned, but they were quite happy. they said it isn't every day that the president comes by and hangs out at your house. the message the president was trying to drive home today was aimed directly at congress and using this backdrop to tell a personal story. >> for them to be burdene
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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